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10 signs you bought too much Christmas crap


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  • You hired an assistant to follow you through stores wheeling a second shopping cart…
  • You’re stranded on Interstate 80 wondering if you should have taken that spare tire out of your trunk for the extra storage space…
  • You’ve purchased something for everyone including Mr. Slippers your cat, and you’re now contemplating buying gifts for several of your potted plants…
  • When you return home from the mall your 12 passenger mini-van seats one comfortably…
  • Your husband and dog will be sleeping in the garage until 12/25 to accommodate the gift stockpile in your bedroom…
  • You had to re-finance your home to pay for wrapping paper…
  • Your family room has been converted into a storage facility for game controllers, joysticks and AA batteries…
  • Over 40 acres of old growth forest will be needed to wrap the items in your ‘Christmas Grab’…
  • It takes your kids more than a day to open their gifts…
  • Your December credit card statement will come parcel post…
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Wednesday, December 17, 2008

disposing of those dead battery bodies


Just as our bodies require an electrical current to function, so do the cell phones, remote controls, cordless power tools, and incredibly various electronic devices that have swarmed into our lives today. They’re all charged by batteries whose increasing presence within trash bins has been associated with numerous wildlife disruptions by way of their heavy metals (mercury, lead, cadmium, and/or nickel) within.  Although rechargeable batteries allow for less battery usage overall, they’re still comprised of nickel-cadmium and pose a serious danger when not properly recycled.  Additionally, valuable metals within the battery structure that could be re-used are instead put to waste.

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Fortunately, there are an increasing number of battery-recycling operations revving up across the nation that help to provide safe and useful resting places for the many dead battery bodies.  A battery-recycling program called The Big Green Box has been joining many stores (such as IKEA, Walgreens and Whole Foods) to provide drop-off stations for batteries and portable electronic devices. If these stores aren’t nearby, then one can easily navigate to a recycling center using the Battery Recycling and Disposal Guide provided by Environment, Health and Safety Online (EHSO). In the meanwhile, seek out ways to charge your life with things besides batteries, minimize the volume of batteries coursing through your life, and check out Earth 911 for tips on extending battery life overall.

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Whole Foods – last minute holiday gifts


I hate to admit it but I’m a really last minute shopper.  I may ruminate for weeks but actually making it happen is something that I leave to the last minute. Am I preaching to the choir?  Lucky for us, Whole Foods markets have sprouted up all over the country, (close to 160 doors to date); they’re open late and they have lots of wonderful body and planet-friendly gifts for everyone on my list. And you won’t have to break the bank.  Many of these green ideas cost less than $25, 365 days of the year, just look for the 365 label, Whole Foods’ “house” brand.

I shop at their Columbus Circle location, but you can find the one nearest you via their Web site. Whether you choose to prepare a special dish for that special someone, or simply pick-up a non-food related gift, right off the shelf, here are a few ideas that could come in handy for your gift-giving this season:

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Whole Body, the health, beauty and clothing section of the market is filled with possibilities. (more…)

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a mixed bag of green news


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