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recycled plates become pretty eco bracelet


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Take some colorful, recycled, used plates, add equal parts good taste and jewelry design chops and you have the potential for lovely results.  In this one of a kind piece (above), each of the nine plates used is hand ground and mounted in a sterling silver bezel.  Find this beauty @ TheBrokenPlate for $100.

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Tuesday, January 26, 2010

live from go green LA – recycling for cash


The Go Green Expo in Los Angeles this past weekend was full of really fabulous green gadgets.  There were solar powered flashlights, portable photovoltaic cells, smart power strips, soda makers, electric bikes, stress relieving hunks of gold and detoxifying foot baths full of brownish slop, (seriously).

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One of my favorites, particularly as a college student who sees bottles and cans filling up the garbage, was the concept of a reverse vending machine.  The idea is that you place these reverse vending machines near regular vending machines, and when users are finished with their fizzy beverage they can simply put it into the reverse vending machine’s slot.  The real kicker?  You get money back for recycling.  That’s what makes it different from a recycling can, this time a big incentive to recycle: money!!

The one, (above), featured at the Expo was made by Waste Revolution — it had a fancy screen, hundreds of sensors and a nifty tap and go system, (their website launches in about a month).  They’re brilliant for college campuses or the workplace where you can hook them up to an employee or student id card and give reward points for every can and bottle you recycle.

Let’s be honest though, they’re really just fancy trash compactors.  Made by Waste Revolution they’ll run you about $17,000 and it’s custom made in Taiwan, (5,344 lbs of CO2 emissions by plane). There are several companies that offer reverse vending machines, and they’re relatively common in some parts of Europe. (Although it makes you wonder why people need a monetary incentive to recycle in the first place.)

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Jo & Joe NYC – recycle those designer threads


Serious ecofashionistas (meaning, those who wear designer threads and realize the importance of passing along their once-loved garments) — may want to bookmark this site.

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Two pals from NYC, Jo and Joe have an online consignment shop, JoandJoeNYC.com, whereby you can send them your gently used authentic designer garments and they’ll feature them online in their resale shop.  Be sure to email them before just sending them your clothes.  There are rules.  Easy to follow, but ya gotta respect the rules.  A great way to recycle clothes, recoup some cash or shop for designer threads.

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solar city


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I discovered this design for a Dubai-based “Solar City” – a solar-powered hotel, and residential and entertainment complex – in Alexander Jackson’s portfolio.  The structure is designed to minimize solar gain while maximizing solar energy production.

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The complex is designed on an east-west axis, creating self shading and reducing exposure to low angle sun.  The towers sit above a massive solar array intended to be used for powering the development. Unfortunately, with Dubai’s recent economic difficulties we may not see many of these innovative architectural projects come to fruition.

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