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tables from Pfeifer Studio help renew New Mexico forests


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The folks at New Mexico-based Pfeifer Studio are doing their part to create fine home furnishings while simultaneously aiding efforts to sustain their local environment.  Two new tables from the Studio provide a couple of fine examples of sustainable design and manufacturing practices.

Locally harvested, eco-friendly and full of visual pizazz, the Rio Grande Side Table (above), sculpted from Cottonwood, is created from wood taken from from standing, dead or dying trees cleared from burn areas along the Rio Grande River.  Part of an effort to rehabilitate the area, the trees were harvested and turned into cleverly shaped side tables and finished with a non-toxic topcoat finish.  Each table will feature its own unique cracks and crevices that will naturally occur as the wood shrinks and ages.  The cracks don’t affect the structural integrity of the piece, but do enhance its natural character.

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The Russian Olive Stump Table (above) is made from the wood of the Russian Olive tree, an invasive, non-native species introduced as an ornamental to New Mexico in the early 20th Century.  The trees are being removed from the Bosque (the flood plain along the river) in an effort to help restore the eco-system where the Russian Olive has been crowding out native trees along with other non-native species like Salt Cedars and Siberian Elms.  Pfeifer Studio has been snatching them up to make cool, organic side tables.

As an added environmental plus, Pfeifer Studio will donate a portion of the proceeds from the sale of these two new exclusive table designs to Tree New Mexico — New Mexico non-profit dedicated to ensuring sustainable forests in urban and rural communities.

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Thursday, September 23, 2010

kanon organic vodka – a tried and true green product review


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Yes, we do love product testing various organic libations.  The folks at Sweden-based Kanon Organic Vodka were gracious enough to send us a bottle of their fine organic vodka…and we must admit, it is particularly tasty.

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This isn’t some “Gordon Gekko-Come-Lately” vodka distilled by a gaggle of Wall Street guys looking to do something “sexy” with their extra cash.  Kanon vodka is distilled at Gripsholm Distillery (pictured above), which has been producing organic vodka, since 1580 (that’s over 400 years for the math challenged) and was regally appointed by King Gustav III in 1775.

Not some stodgy, behind-the-times outfit, Kanon employs a unique, straight run distilling technique that features the finest locally grown organic wheat, pristine spring water from the company’s own source and nothing else, ever.  Their eco-friendly, green distillery is run on wind and water power and all of their byproducts are renewable.

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But all that “green” credibility isn’t worth much if the booze tastes like gasoline and luckily for all involved, our extensive testing confirms that this is a great tasting certified organic vodka, neat or mixed and it’s reasonably priced…very sweet indeed!

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regenesi – eco design, italian style


A collection of refined design for home or person, “sustainable beauty” – all created from post-consumer recycled materials – can be found at Regenesi.

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(above, L to R) A kimono for your vino, the Vinomo:  keeps wine at desired temp, unfolds when not in use for easy storage, made of regenerated leather, 100% recycled & recyclable.  A lightweight lampshade also made of regenerated leather, part of the o-Re-gami collection of home accessories made without the use of glue.

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(above) A set of earrings & bracelet in circles and ellipses in mother of pearl coloured Alicrite made from recycled plastic & recycled antiqued copper plated brass — the Kaisli Kiuru from the Re-Circle Range of jewelry.

Visit regenesi.com, link to their Shop and View Entire Catalogue for more details.

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green news roundup


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photo credit: national geographic

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