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For twelve years, an organization called Conservacion Patagonica has been creating new national parks in the Patagonia region, spanning the countries of Chili and Argentina. Not only does this provide a basis for conservation efforts, but the organization also attracts travelers from all over the world. This provides opportunities for ecotourism, raising awareness for environmental issues as well as funds to support the expansion of national parks throughout Patagonia.

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The park’s mission points out that: “Few conservation organizations in the world tackle the task of building new national parks, but we’re committed to creating parks that protect some of Earth’s last wild places while benefiting their community and nation.” The organization was founded in 2000 by Kristine Tompkins. She worked previously as the CEO of Patagonia clothing before initiating this sustainable and inspiring movement towards the preservation, mitigation and appreciation of the natural wonders of Patagonia.

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The series of National Parks founded by Conservacion Patagonica currently includes Monte Leon National Park in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina as well as plans for the Future Patagonia National Park located in Aysen Region, Chile. This future park will span 650,000 acres of wetlands, forests, mountains, grasslands and rivers, maintaining and preserving the rich biodiversity found throughout Chile’s wild landscape.

The Conservacion Patagonica staff is supported by a large group of volunteers, interns, tourists and locals with a common passion for natural beauty and wonder. The organization maintains a satellite office in Sausalito, California and receives donations from around the world. The projects are funded largely by multiple foundations such as the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Arcadia Fund, the Butler Conservation Fund, and the Wallace Genetic Foundation to name a few.

For more information on this incredible, expanding project, visit: www.conservacionpatagonica.org

related: more eco travel articles on The Alternative Consumer