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Friday, October 3, 2014

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Make Your Own DIY Solar Power Generator


There are many benefits of using solar power to run the electronic gadgets within your home. For one, you can reduce your carbon footprint as solar electricity releases no carbon dioxide or other harmful pollutants into the environment. The cost of your electricity bills will be reduced substantially too. This is due to the fact sunlight is readily available, so most of the expenditure will take place during the initial installation.

If you’re undecided about investing in solar power due to the price of this initial outlay, Rapid Online has put together a simple guide on how to create your very own solar power generator.

Read on and find out how a solar panel, a charge controller, a deep cycle batter, an inverter, some wires and wire connectors are all you need to run an energy-saving light bulb for 25 hours or a laptop computer for up to eight.

DIY Solar Panel Infographic

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Sunday, September 28, 2014

Wind Energy: As Easy As Flying a Kite … A Very Big Kite


altaeros wind turbine

If you find yourself traveling down your 5-mile gravel driveway in the pouring rain, returning from a bi-weekly grocery run or a quick trip to the mailbox, and an unidentified flying donut appears high in the evening sky, do not be alarmed. It is not going to hurt you; this is not an Independence Day-type scenario; the Led Zeppelin tour likely has not stopped in your small town in rural America, either. Your home greets you with porch and interior lights as you clamber up the steps to your front door, reusable grocery bags and a wealth of paper bills in hand. You find that the phone, television, internet and trash utilities await payment, but the power bill has been strangely absent for some time. Soon thereafter, you collapse into your couch and turn the television to the nightly news, where the headline story covers the widespread electrical outages in the city in the next county. The newscaster says that high winds and heavy rains have knocked out critical elements of the power grid leaving hundreds without electricity, as you think to yourself, “what was that man’s name from Altaeros? I must thank him for the ‘BAT’ outside.”

altaeros wind turbines

Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Altaeros is a leading innovator in the wind energy sector, recently receiving a large grant from the Alaska Energy Authority to field test their new Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) system in the skies over Fairbanks, Alaska.  (more…)

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Transparent Photovoltaic Glass May Soon Power Smartphones and Buildings


Apollo Glass

There are so many technologies and sensory contraptions packed into today’s smart devices, the average Joe or Jane would not know of many besides perhaps the battery, some sort of high-definition touchscreen and a few volume, home and power buttons. To illustrate, one could consider the Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphone as an all-in-one personal computer, television, digital camera, cordless payphone, flashlight, mp3 player, global positioning device, and personal trainer. If we include what these little metal and glass rectangles can replace through software functions, one could also consider them alarm clocks, calendars, shopping malls, personalized banking centers, address books, instant messengers, newspapers, or photo albums. Most adults in the United States are walking around with small weathermen, stockbrokers and personal assistants in their pockets; wireless and free to move about their daily lives, these smart devices still must inevitably rest and recharge just like their owners. But in the near future, just as we may feel energized from a cool, radiant day, our smart devices may benefit from some daily sunlight exposure as well.  (more…)

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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Spray Paint Solar Power: Coming Soon to a Building or Car Near You


Perovskite

We are all about to have a good laugh. The bulky solar panels gracing many rooftops and carports across the country are soon to be just about as “cool” and “hip” as having a VCR player or flip-phone today. Scientists at the University of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England have engineered an unconventional method to obtain energy from the sun, by using spray-paint. Yes, spray-paint. The future is nigh. (more…)

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Monday, September 1, 2014

The Virtual Water Dilemma: Act 2 – Energy


water droplet falling

When we flip on the TV and hear about water scarcity, the suggested ways to conserve are usually to water our yard less and use less water in our home.  It might interest you to know that even turning on that TV is using water in the form of virtual water. Virtual water is all the water that goes into the production of a product; and it often goes unnoticed by consumers.

Like food, energy consumption is another area where we are guilty of using virtual water. Because the production of both electricity and fuel use large amounts of water when consumed, we increase our virtual water footprint on an ongoing basis. As already discussed in Act One, more than 50 percent goes into our food production. But water is also used up in the production of the energy that we rely on to support our everyday lives. On average, an American relies on about 670 gallons of water a day just in energy consumption. (more…)

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Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Gidgi solar charging smartphone case – a green Kickstarter project


gidgi smartphone solar charger

Why not tap into solar energy to keep your ravenous iPhone charged at all times? Smartphones are constantly in use, guzzling energy and demanding more juice. Many companies have tried and few (if any) have succeeded, in creating a one-size-fits-all solar charging case for the ubiquitous smartphone.

gidgi solar charging phone case

A little Minneapolis start-up, Solar Surge, has designed a solution, a versatile smartphone solar charging case – the Gidgi – that can accommodate a wide variety smartphones – keeping your phone charged via free solar energy – indoors or out. The idea of a group of young college grads who are seeking crowdfunding via their recently launched Kickstarter project.

iphone gidgi solar charger

The Gidgi features a case made out of durable, good looking components that are intended to have a long lifespan. The life cycle of the Gidgi is further extended by its ability to charge (more…)

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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Kickstarter Project: ProGo propane powered motor scooter


progo 3000 propane powered scooter

Have a short commute? Like to zip around city streets and sidewalks like a motorized 10-year old? Zev Charles Ellenberg and his company, ProGo Recreation, are trying to revitalize the motorized scooter market by going green. The ProGo 3000 propane-powered scooter has an on-going Kickstarter project with the modest goal of raising $18,000 for the production and marketing of their low-emissions scooter. Propane’s high octane and low-carbon and oil-contamination characteristics have resulted in greater engine life and significantly lower carbon emissions than conventional gasoline engines.

progo folded

The small, 16.4 oz., propane canister used to power the ProGo 3000 is readily available and easy to change. You can even pack an extra canister in your backpack to insure you don’t run out of fuel while you’re bopping around campus or running errands. Unlike electric scooters that need to be recharged for up to 4 to 8 hours to provide an hour or so of ride time – a single propane canister is estimated to keep you zipping around for 2 to 3 hours at speeds up to 20mph – without the smell, mess and emissions associated with a similar gasoline powered engine. progo engine and tank

Some features:

  • EPA AND CAPB Approved / California Legal
  • Easy pull start
  • 25cc 4 stroke propane engine
  • Lightweight, durable steel frame
  • 20 mph top speed – 2-3 hours run time per 16.4oz propane canister
  • Folds for convenient carrying and storage
  • No Choke, no priming, and no carburetor gum-up, no need for winterizing

Propane pluses:
Utilizing propane as a vehicle fuel source instead of gasoline reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and increases energy security.  Propane’s fuel mixture is completely gaseous and doesn’t suffer from the cold start problems associated with liquid fuel. Propane is nontoxic, nonpoisonous, and insoluble in water. Compared with vehicles fueled by conventional diesel and gasoline, propane vehicles can produce lower amounts of many harmful air pollutants and greenhouse gases, depending on vehicle type, drive cycle, and engine calibration. source: The Alternative Fuels Data Center

The GoPro 3000 will retail for around $449 when it ships in October, 2014. If you pledge $399 you can get one at a reduced price.

Check out the ProGo Kickstarter project which runs through August 24th.

related: more alternative scooters featured on The Alternative Consumer

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Friday, July 18, 2014

5 of the Best Companies That Use Alternative Energy


solar panel and sun

Alternative energy sources reduce carbon emissions and offer a sustainable solution for power use. By using renewable energies, these companies are helping the country shift away from its dependence on fossil fuels. This is a major environmental movement, and several big names are leading the way.

Intel Corporation: Massive Purchases of Energy Credits
The Intel Corporation has an annual usage of more than three million kilowatt-hours (kWh), 100% of which is sourced from green power resources. Intel uses biogas, biomass, small-hydro, solar, and wind power. It purchases the majority of its power through renewable energy certificates. However, Intel also generates some green power of its own through 18 solar plants with a capacity of about 7,000 kilowatts (kW). Altogether, the company’s use of green energy has the equivalent impact of taking more than 455,000 passenger cars off the road annually.

Kohl’s Department Stores: On-Site Renewable Energy
Kohl’s uses more than 1.5 million kWh annually, but manages to get 105% of its energy from renewable sources. By producing more green energy than it uses, this company is able to actually put excess renewable energy back onto the grid. Kohl’s purchases renewable energy credits that offset 100% of its power usage. On top of that, the company uses solar panels on select stores. These panels can provide up to 40% of the store’s power in 156 locations across 12 states.

Kohl’s also activated wind turbines on two sites. Vertical turbines outside a store in Findlay, Ohio generate approximately 40,000 kWh a year. Horizontal turbines in Corpus Christi, Texas provide 14,000 kWh annually. Wind turbines are an innovative option that are often powered by the same transformers used for more traditional forms of energy, which allows companies like Solomon Corporation to gradually enter the green market with wind turbine projects.

Whole Foods Market: Energy Efficient Stores
Nearly everything about Whole Foods Market is designed to create a greener environment, so it’s no surprise that this company supplies 107% of its energy usage through renewable resources. A recently constructed Whole Foods store in Brooklyn showcases the extreme lengths to which this company goes to create a green environment. The store uses energy-efficient lighting, refrigeration, and heating systems. Solar canopies in the parking lot supply 20% of the store’s energy, and the lot’s street lights are powered by small-scale wind and solar power systems.

Whole Foods has regularly purchased renewable energy credits to offset its power usage since 2006. The company’s trucks are gradually converting to biodiesel fuels as well.

Staples: Hitting Impressively High Goals
Staples has lofty goals when it comes to its green vision. The company aims to offer only sustainable products, recycle 100% of the technology that it sells, and produce zero waste in its operations. Though it hasn’t hit these goals yet, it’s come particularly far in its attempt to maximize renewable energy use. The company gets 106% of its annual power use of more than 630,000,000 kWh from renewable sources.

Not only does Staples buy energy from renewable sources, it has solar panels on the roofs of many stores to provide additional green power. Staples has also partnered with companies that are pioneering sustainable business practices, such as Rainforest Alliance SmartSource, the GreenBlue Sustainable Packaging Coalition, and CarbonFund.

Unilever: Shifting Energy Usage
Unilever, like the other companies on this list, offsets 100% of its energy use through the purchase of renewable energy credits. While this goes a long way toward supporting the use of renewable energy, it doesn’t actually reduce the amount of non-renewable energy that the company uses upfront. Unilever is taking its energy campaign a step further by striving to cut down on the total non-renewable energy that it consumes.

The company reports that by the end of 2013, renewable energy made up 27% of the company’s total upfront energy use. This is a marked improvement over 15.8% from 2008. Unilever’s goal is to get 40% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020.

Consumers who want to support green energy initiatives can do so easily by shopping at retailers who are part of this movement.

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